smashsurvey:

For two days, we surveyed the fan presence for the narrative podcast Welcome to Night Vale here on tumblr. Commonplace Books’ horror/mystery series follows the broadcasts of Cecil Palmer, a radio host in the town of Night Vale. Cecil’s dynamic with his boyfriend Carlos is a frequent feature on the show and has been a point of contention with homophobic bloggers on the site before, but now it seems WTNV’s diverse cast and progressive stance has attracted a new kind of scumbag attitude. 

So, is the WTNV fandom community racist? 
We asked the tags if they thought the community that formed around Night Vale had turned unwelcoming towards people of color and interpretations of figures on the show as characters of color — and, specifically, if they’d seen accepted white supremacist and overtly racist attitudes in what should be safe fan spaces. For a show as progressive and accepting as Night Vale is, the results were upsetting. 
Read More

If 89% of surveyed fans agree the fandom is unsafe for people of color, then why-WHY are they allowing a small contingent of crazies to make it unsafe?! I mean, I realize Tea Partiers shut down the government, but come on now. COME ON NOW. It’s NIGHT VALE. It’s the ONE show that’s doing it right, or at least righter than everything else available right now. GOD, I AM SO ENRAGED. Why?! WHY?!

smashsurvey:

For two days, we surveyed the fan presence for the narrative podcast Welcome to Night Vale here on tumblr. Commonplace Books’ horror/mystery series follows the broadcasts of Cecil Palmer, a radio host in the town of Night Vale. Cecil’s dynamic with his boyfriend Carlos is a frequent feature on the show and has been a point of contention with homophobic bloggers on the site before, but now it seems WTNV’s diverse cast and progressive stance has attracted a new kind of scumbag attitude. 

image

So, is the WTNV fandom community racist? 

We asked the tags if they thought the community that formed around Night Vale had turned unwelcoming towards people of color and interpretations of figures on the show as characters of color — and, specifically, if they’d seen accepted white supremacist and overtly racist attitudes in what should be safe fan spaces. For a show as progressive and accepting as Night Vale is, the results were upsetting. 

Read More

If 89% of surveyed fans agree the fandom is unsafe for people of color, then why-WHY are they allowing a small contingent of crazies to make it unsafe?! I mean, I realize Tea Partiers shut down the government, but come on now. COME ON NOW. It’s NIGHT VALE. It’s the ONE show that’s doing it right, or at least righter than everything else available right now. GOD, I AM SO ENRAGED. Why?! WHY?!

(via eviloverlibrarian)

Tumblr, sometimes you get on my nerves. Sometimes, it’s like, dammit, my soul cannot bear another post about a missing child, a hate crime, a disgusting fact about our depressing American plutocracy. But, I have to acknowledge, this is one of the few places I get to hear about these things. About people who are upset about these things. From people actually affected by them.

I never quite grasped the concept of an “online community” until I joined this website. Before Tumblr, the most I could see of the internet was that it was a bunch of strangers either yelling at each other or stroking each other’s egos, more or less. But logging on to Tumblr feels a little like visiting an island of real people in a stormy sea of bullshitters. People seem free to feel vulnerable or stupid or forgiving or conscious. There’s a lot of laughter here, people sharing what makes them happy or support for people they don’t even know or what they’re passionate about, without that fear you find in the real world of, “oh, maybe this person doesn’t want to hear that.” But on tumblr they do. That’s why they’re following you.

I’m not denying the existence of hater anons (or identifiable haters), but still, all the social consciousness, all the body positivity, all the personal posts and pictures and puns makes me feel like this is a really good place to be, Yahoo or no Yahoo.

Thanks to all the followers, not just for following me (though I am ever so grateful), but just for being part of something awesome. And big thanks to the people I am following. You all are SO wonderful, and you are what makes my experience here so great.

geek-studio:

R2-D2 Measuring Cups

Damn you, Think Geek. DAMN. YOU.

(via loisthelibrarian)

librarianbyday:

(via xkcd: Free Speech)
"Why do some libraries insist on developing website content that is not being used? There’s no doubt it would be great if library users came to our sites to read book reviews, listen to podcasts, and calculate the value that the library delivers to them. We want to be a valuable resource. We want people to trust our opinions and rely on us for guidance. But just because this would be wonderful doesn’t mean it is going to happen."

— Aaron Schmidt, Give them what they want: the user experience | LibraryJournal (via thepinakes)

(via professionalbooknerd)

outofprintclothing:

R.I.P. Gabriel García Márquez

outofprintclothing:

R.I.P. Gabriel García Márquez

twigbookshop:

Rest in peace, Gabo. 

I’m a person who does not have many favorite writers, only favorite stories, but this man is in that small category. Brilliant, brilliant storyteller. 

(via gtpubliclibrary)

america-wakiewakie:

Our eyes tell us that people look different. No one has trouble distinguishing a Czech from a Chinese. But what do those differences mean? Are they biological? Has race always been with us? How does race affect people today?

There’s less - and more - to race than meets the eye:

1. Race is a modern idea. Ancient societies, like the Greeks, did not divide people according to physical distinctions, but according to religion, status, class, even language. The English language didn’t even have the word ‘race’ until it turns up in 1508 in a poem by William Dunbar referring to a line of kings.

2. Race has no genetic basis. Not one characteristic, trait or even gene distinguishes all the members of one so-called race from all the members of another so-called race.

3. Human subspecies don’t exist. Unlike many animals, modern humans simply haven’t been around long enough or isolated enough to evolve into separate subspecies or races. Despite surface appearances, we are one of the most similar of all species.

4. Skin color really is only skin deep. Most traits are inherited independently from one another. The genes influencing skin color have nothing to do with the genes influencing hair form, eye shape, blood type, musical talent, athletic ability or forms of intelligence. Knowing someone’s skin color doesn’t necessarily tell you anything else about him or her.

5. Most variation is within, not between, “races.” Of the small amount of total human variation, 85% exists within any local population, be they Italians, Kurds, Koreans or Cherokees. About 94% can be found within any continent. That means two random Koreans may be as genetically different as a Korean and an Italian.

6. Slavery predates race. Throughout much of human history, societies have enslaved others, often as a result of conquest or war, even debt, but not because of physical characteristics or a belief in natural inferiority. Due to a unique set of historical circumstances, ours was the first slave system where all the slaves shared similar physical characteristics.

7. Race and freedom evolved together. The U.S. was founded on the radical new principle that “All men are created equal.” But our early economy was based largely on slavery. How could this anomaly be rationalized? The new idea of race helped explain why some people could be denied the rights and freedoms that others took for granted.

8. Race justified social inequalities as natural. As the race idea evolved, white superiority became “common sense” in America. It justified not only slavery but also the extermination of Indians, exclusion of Asian immigrants, and the taking of Mexican lands by a nation that professed a belief in democracy. Racial practices were institutionalized within American government, laws, and society.

9. Race isn’t biological, but racism is still real. Race is a powerful social idea that gives people different access to opportunities and resources. Our government and social institutions have created advantages that disproportionately channel wealth, power, and resources to white people. This affects everyone, whether we are aware of it or not.

10. Colorblindness will not end racism. Pretending race doesn’t exist is not the same as creating equality. Race is more than stereotypes and individual prejudice. To combat racism, we need to identify and remedy social policies and institutional practices that advantage some groups at the expense of others.

RACE - The Power of an Illusion was produced by California Newsreel in association with the Independent Television Service (ITVS). Major funding provided by the Ford Foundation and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Diversity Fund.

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via referenceforwriters)

selfcareafterrape:

The Basics:
Common Responses to Rape/Sexual Assault(ppt)
Talking About Trauma (ppt)
Traumaversaries
Why You Aren’t Bad for Loving Your Abuser.
Need Help With:
Sleep
Nightmares
Surviving the Holidays (ppt)
Overstimulated Nerves
Self-Injury (ppt)
Flashbacks (ppt)
Dissociating (ppt)
Triggers:
I’m triggered- Now What?
More On Triggers
On Purposely Triggering Yourself
Boundaries:
Boundaries (ppt)
Boundaries 101
Boundaries: How to set them
Self-Care:
What is Self Care Anyway?
BACE Method
Self Care When You Lack a Sense of Self
Interpersonal Self-Care
Emotional Self Care
Physical Self Care
Consent/sex:
Intimacy After Rape
Lets Talk Consent
Lets Talk Sex
Sexuality After Rape
For Friends/Family/Partners of Survivors:
How to Help a Friend Who Has Been Raped.(ppt)
Avoiding Awkward- How to talk about rape when we talk to survivors.(ppt)
Sometimes the easiest thing to say is the worst.
A Friend is Self Harming (ppt)
Comfort In. Complain Out.
What Can I Do?
A Friend is Dissociating.(ppt)

deadlydinos:

When straight men are like “but if I share a locker room with a gay guy he might look at me!”

Okay leaving aside the fact that gay doesn’t mean attracted to you

And gay doesn’t mean “lacking in any sort of human decency or inability to prevent staring”

DOES THE THOUGHT OF SOMEONE LOOKING AT YOU IN A SEXUAL WAY, EVEN THOUGH YOU’RE NOT TRYING TO BE SEXUAL, MAKE YOU SLIGHTLY UNCOMFORTABLE MY STRAIGHT MALE FRIEND?

DOES IT

DOES

IT

(via countingbooks)

Tags: lulz

No subject is terrible if the story is true, if the story is clean and honest, and if it affirms courage and grace under pressure.

I was the only one of my friends who absolutely adored this movie. I seriously debated getting new friends.

(Source: maarytudor, via almostyalibrarian)

"Being tender and open is beautiful. As a woman, I feel continually shhh’ed. Too sensitive. Too mushy. Too wishy washy. Blah blah. Don’t let someone steal your tenderness. Don’t allow the coldness and fear of others to tarnish your perfectly vulnerable beating heart. Nothing is more powerful than allowing yourself to truly be affected by things. Whether it’s a song, a stranger, a mountain, a rain drop, a tea kettle, an article, a sentence, a footstep, feel it all – look around you. All of this is for you. Take it and have gratitude. Give it and feel love."

Zooey Deschanel (via sugar-and-heartbreak)

(Source: sassysailormouth, via wiseacrewhimsy)

(Source: ala-con, via thecommonlibrarian)

Tags: librarians

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time
all right, okay. let’s talk.
last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.
i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc
and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable
and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues
but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?
we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.
we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.
we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.
we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.
we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.
we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.
it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

All that’s missing is a mike drop.

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time

all right, okay. let’s talk.

last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.

i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc

and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable

and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues

but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?

we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.

we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.

we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.

we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.

we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.

we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.

it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

All that’s missing is a mike drop.

(via sudo-rm--rf)

darthmoonmoon:

sammys-bitch:

tommilsom:

unphh:

ultrabatsexybananas:

cannabiskitties:

Holy shit our lungs are crazy

I don’t know whether to be disgusted or amazed…

meat balloons

these are doing this inside you right now 

What have you done?!

lungs are so weeeeird

Wow. I never want to smoke another cigarette ever.

(Source: arsanatomica, via itsnotlogicitsameanstoanend)